Roadtrip to Yellowstone

April 29 – May 3, 2007

Photo set on Flickr

Vancouver to Yellowstone, 3100+ km roundtrip, 12 hours one way. That’s all I knew about the upcoming trip.

The day after my last final exam we (I was the driver and my girlfriend was the passenger) set off to Yellowstone National Park.  What was supposed to be an early start became a 10 am struggle to get off the bed and a late lunch that ended at 13:00.  We had a disgusting dinner at an IHOP in Newport, a suburb of Seattle, and spent the night at the nearby Motel 6.  While preparing to sleep I figured we were probably a thousand km away from our targeted goal of the day – some random town in Montana.  I anticipated the long day of driving ahead by being insomniac for the night.

What I found out over the next day, over 10 hours of driving and 1000+ km was this formula: Coffee + Red Bull > Sleep.

Some photos I took along the way:

Because Washington is called the Emerald State, I have always thought the whole state is as green as the coastal area along I-5. But only two hours east of Seattle along I-90, after passing the Cascade Range, the landscape turns into inarable dryland that stretches into the horizon. This lake is the first concentration of water and greenery we saw after Seattle, a five hours drive ago.
Because Washington is called the Emerald State, I have always thought the whole state is as green as the coastal area along I-5. But only two hours east of Seattle along I-90, after passing the Cascade Range, the landscape turns into a dryland that stretches into the horizon. After passing this lake, there will not be another patch of greenery until Moses Lake, another two hour drive to the east.
A monument on top of a hill that overlooks Wanapum Lake.
A monument on top of a hill that overlooks Wanapum Lake.
One of our many washroom or fuel stops. Another two hours away from the Washington/Idaho border.
One of our many washroom or fuel stops. Another two hours away from the Washington/Idaho border. Shortly into Idaho is Coeur d’Alene, a resort town with many golf courses and an even more construction sites. The town’s biggest attraction is its namesake lake.
A heavy fog surrounded the mountains when we approached the Idaho/Montana border. I first thought there was forest fire
A heavy fog surrounded the mountains when we approached the Idaho/Montana border. Luckily the fog did not spread to the freeway.
Since crossing the Montana border, the scenery became an endless display of mountains covered by a mixture of oily and dark green. Even though the drive through Montana was the longest of part of our road trip, it was also the most enjoyable.
We finally left I-90 after leaving Bozeman and began the last stretch to Yellowstone on US 89. After passing through Spokane in Washington, the vehicles we saw the most were cargo trucks, and the living things (besides trees) we bumped into the most (literally) were bugs. The windshield and bumper of my car was covered by blood and slime of bugs.
We finally left I-90 after leaving Bozeman and began the last stretch to Yellowstone on US 89. After passing through Spokane in Washington, the vehicles we saw the most were cargo trucks, and the living things (besides trees) we bumped into the most (literally) were bugs. The windshield and bumper of my car was covered by blood and slime of the bugs.
Finally, after 1500 km, the gateway town of Yellowstone, Gardiner.
Finally, after 1500 km, the gateway town of Yellowstone, Gardiner.
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s